3 Insurance Jobs That Are in High Demand

In today’s modern day world, most people carry at least one insurance policy. Insurance is what protects consumers from financial calamity should an unexpected event occur. The average person will have at least four different insurance policies: Auto, home, life and health. Because insurance is something that people will continue to need for the foreseeable future, a career in the insurance industry is a smart and secure choice. Before you start searching for current Insurance jobs, you need to determine what path you want take. Below are some of the most in-demand careers in the insurance industry. Actuaries Actuaries are a vital part of any insurance company. Their job is to analyze the financial ramifications of uncertainty and risk. Using financial theory, mathematics and statistics, actuaries are able to assess risks for business and individual clients. Armed with this knowledge, companies can implement policies that help minimize these risks. Actuaries work full-time and most perform their duties in an office setting. Some actuaries work as consultants, which allows them to travel and meet with clients. In order to become an actuary, you must first earn a bachelor’s degree and pass a series of exams before you can become certified. You must possess strong mathematic, business and statistic skills. The average salary for an actuary is $93,000 per year, and this field is expected to grow 26 percent in the next decade. Claims Investigators The job of a claims investigator is to assess a claim and determine whether or not the insurance company must pay and how much they need to pay. Individuals in this field work full-time and outside of the office. They spend a great deal of time inspecting properties where insurance claims were made, such as damaged cars and buildings. To gain an entry-level position as a claims investigator, all you need is a high school diploma. To move up in this career, you may need to earn a bachelor’s degree or, in the very least, gain some insurance experience. The average claims investigator earns $59,000 per year. Insurance Sales Agents Insurance sales agents serve as the sales force for insurance companies. Their job is to sell policies to consumers and businesses. They may specialize in selling one type of insurance, or they may sell various different types of policies. In addition to selling policies, an insurance sales agent will also explain what each policy entails and help consumers choose the right policy for their needs. Insurance sales agents typically work for insurance brokerages and agencies. Some will work directly for one company. Regardless of what type of insurance they are selling, sales agents typically work in an office environment. Most insurance sales agents have a high school diploma, but many are now earning bachelor’s degrees. Every sales agent must be licensed in the state that they plan on working in. The average insurance sales agent earns $48,000 per year. Unlike a traditional salary, insurance agents rely on commissions for compensation. This means that as a sales agent, you have the power to earn as much as you want. Job opportunities in this field are expected to grow 10 percent by 2022....

Ask Your Boss: How To Negotiate a Job Offer...

“I am currently applying for a position at an organization. I’m in the final stages of the interview process and things seem to be going well. While I don’t know for certain that I will get a job offer, I suspect it will happen. My question is what tools you can offer for negotiating the starting salary. In the job listing, there was a range for the salary. My wife says that I should ask for the top of that range, but I don’t want to ask for too much and start off on the wrong foot. So, I’m curious, how should one go about negotiating a higher salary at the start? What sort of information should be referenced and in what order?? I’d appreciate any advice you can lend. THANKS!” Negotiating a salary is scary for some, and easy for others. Most of us choose to forgo negotiating. I, personally, always dreaded this part of job interviews, even though I love to bargain. From a boss’s point of view I have to admit that I am always interested to see if a candidate will bring up a question about money. Right off the bat, I will tell you this: do not discuss money until a job offer is made. Otherwise, I (as a boss) lose respect for you. There are a lot of things that are unclear to me in your question. What kind of organization is it? Some government agencies will not negotiate anything because they have a set of salary ranges. Some corporations can offer and agree to more than they list in a job posting. Some non-profits do not have very good grant financing available and their salary offers are very limited. No matter what it is, it is always worth trying. Below I am going to provide five essential tips that should help you in your salary negotiating. If you would like to follow up with me after reading this post, feel free. You can either email me or submit another form (applies to all my readers, by the way.) Five Things to Know When Negotiating a Job Offer: Know about the company and what it can afford. Estimate it or guess it. In fact, if you still have another interview coming up, I recommend fishing for this information. Subtly. Ask a question “I noticed that there were no personnel cuts in the past few years. What do you attribute this to?” Know your lowest salary range that you can accept and live with it. Calculate your expenses, your income, and include in your estimate your financial goals (future or present.) Then talk to your wife. Know your market value. Do you know what others are making in the same position, working for a different company? Are you worth more because you have successfully completed a mba program? You have to do some research, talk to your friends and/or use Glassdoor.com. Know if this job has been open for a while. If the answer is “yes”, then it gives you more leverage to negotiate. The possible reasons can be as following: they cannot find a qualified candidate, the skills required for the position are unique, or they don’t know what they want (that’s a whole different discussion.) Know that even if you do not get the desired salary, you can still negotiate your vacation time, your work schedule, relocation expenses, overtime and so on. Just lately, I was wrapped up in a salary negotiation...

Ask Your Boss: How Do I Tell My Manager About a Job Offer?...

One of my readers submitted a question. Please read the question below carefully before reading my answer. Have something to add? Please do so in the comment section. I was recently asked by a friend/mentor in my network to lunch. We have had lunch once a month or so over the past 6-8 months so this was nothing out of the ordinary. Our discussions typically had a focus on business with regards to anything from analytics to operations to development. So this conversation was not out of the ordinary until the end. I was asked if I would come meet her team at the company she works for and that she would like to offer me position X, at a salary noticeably greater than my current salary.  I am not unhappy with my current employer and salary and am in fact very happy with them. I would like to bring this up to my manager though. How does it make sense to approach this? Will my manager likely think I am only motivated by money and lose interest in keeping me? Let’s be honest, you are going to tell your manager about this job offer because you want a counteroffer, some sort of monetary acknowledgment of your value to the company. You like your job, you just want more money, right? So to answer your last question, I am going to say “yes.” There is a very strong possibility that your manager will think that you are trying to extort a raise by threatening to leave. For the sake of this post discussion, and not knowing anything else, I will assume that your company is doing well financially, not going through lay offs, and is able to give raises. I can see two possibilities that can take place. First, you might not get a counteroffer. That would be the case if I were your boss. I would wish you good luck, and you would be on your way to your new job before you could blink twice. Luckily for you, I am not your boss. This brings us to the second possibility. Your manager might consider keeping you for whatever reason, and as a result of this consideration you will get what you want, i.e. a counteroffer. No matter what happens, I can promise you that it is going to be a very uncomfortable conversation for both of you. You already are worried about coming across as greedy, and legitimately so. If you decide to talk to your manager, go into this conversation with confidence because let’s admit it, you can negotiate from the position of strength. You do have a job offer. So, assuming, you have enough leverage to rely on, this is what I recommend: Do not go into the conversation with an attitude that you have the world at your feet. You don’t. Do not use your new job offer as a threat to negotiate a raise. In fact, the raise you get this way might be used against your next raise. Preparation is key. Take your time planning, structuring, rehearsing. Listen to yourself, and make sure you don’t sound like a greedy jerk. It sounds odd, but you might be surprised what comes out of your mouth when you are nervous. Be honest. Tell your manager what happened, and how you feel about it. Explain why you are having this conversation. Make sure to tell your manager why you love your current job. Rehearse in...